Find work. When you first start out, you may have to accept work writing about a topic you don’t find all that interesting. You must keep an open mind and be willing to accept work that may not be in your desired field. However, as you continue to write, you not only learn about more topics, but you also build your reputation. With time, you can be choosier about assignments you want to accept.[19]

If you’ve got a way with words and expertise in a niche, there are plenty of sites that will pay for articles and content you write. Think of the sites you read regularly. What can you contribute to them that would be interesting? Research your niche and then look for ways to pitch articles. Many sites will simply have a submission or contact link in the footer. To get started, check out my full guide to becoming a freelance writer on the side and then submit your articles to places like Instash, Listverse, TopTenz, A List Apart, International Living, FundsforWriters, and Textbroker.
Tutor students. Many families prefer the flexibility of using an online tutor. Depending on your background, you could be simply helping a child with homework or providing college-level support. You need to have your own computer and high speed internet. Experience required differs among companies. Some require “strong experience,” while others require a specific educational background. However, most companies do require a college degree.

Consider selling in lots. A lot is a collection of similar items that is sold in a group. For example, if you have a collection of books, magazines or similar pieces of jewelry, consider selling them all at once in a lot. You many not make as much money as you would have if you sold each item separately. However, the items will likely sell more quickly in a lot than they would individually.[29]
Nice post Annie. I have another to consider – Offer a litter cleanup service outside commercial properties. This service is provided on foot using simple hand tools. You contract with real estate management companies to maintain their properties litter free. I started this a a side gig in 1981 and grew it into a successful business that I still operate. I share my success in my book, Cleanlots – America’s Simplest Business, as well as provide free support. Would you be interested in learning more?

There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.
To canvass for ideas, we teamed up with Adams Business (a unit of F+W Media), publisher of The Start Your Own Business Bible, released this month. The book contains 501 "new ventures you can launch today," each with its own breakdown---including the startup funding required (as little as $500 in some cases), an overview of the product or service, the typical fee structure, initial equipment needed, hidden costs, operational tips and more---to give budding entrepreneurs an idea of what they're getting into. (Author Richard Walsh was unavailable for comment.)
I’ve been providing a simple ‘green’ service at commercial properties since 1981. Using only hand tools, I perform a daily litter cleanup service for the exterior property (sidewalks, parking lot, landscape). Almost as easy as going for a walk! I generate a six figure income yearly from this simple, home based, low cost start up business and I can teach you how to do the same. Details online: http://www.cleanlots.com. Affiliate program available.
There’s plenty of work and clients to be found. If you know where to look. To start, you need to know if there is enough demand for your skill to make it worth the effort to go out looking for work. Start by searching for freelance postings on sites like Flexjobs, SolidGigs, Contena, greatcontent or one of the dozens of other skill-specific freelance job boards.

If you don’t mind doing other people’s chores, then TaskRabbit is a great option for making money online. Earn extra income by walking your neighbor’s dog or mowing Mr. Smith’s lawn. It might seem like not the most lucrative option, but the top taskers reportedly earn as much as $7000 a month, making this a full-time way to make money online for some.
Market your course: The beauty of using a course to make money online is that you can continue to sell it for as long as you’d like. Look for niche communities on Facebook, LinkedIn, or Reddit that might benefit from your content. Guest post on relevant blogs and sites. Look for anywhere you might be able to get in front of the right people. With just a few hours a month you can continue to generate sales.

More and more people are looking for someone to care for their pets when they can't - people who don't like the idea of putting "precious" into a kennel. Professional pet care givers come into the home to care for the pet while the owner is away, feeding, walking, and playing with the animal(s). If you love animals and are knowledgeable about them, this could be a great business for you. According to the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters (NAPPS), in-home pet-care is one of the fastest growing industries in North America today.
It’s not the sort of online money making opportunity that’s covered in glory, but everyone needs a set of eyes to make sure the numbers add up at the end of the year. Every business and most individuals need someone to help prepare tax returns, especially time or resource-strapped small business owners. The Income Tax School provides an array of training programs that'll certify you with tax prep in as little as 10 weeks, and once tax season rolls around you'll be able to charge an average of $229 per return as a freelance tax preparer with this side business idea, reports CNBC.
Dennis Shirshikov is a small business finance writer here at Fit Small Business. Before joining the team, he worked with firms like Cantor Fitzgerald and BGC Partners. He then earned his master’s with a focus in Financial Risk Modeling and spent much of his career working in the startup space as a consultant and as a founder. When not working with small businesses, Dennis also teaches Economics at Queens College.
Dennis Shirshikov is a small business finance writer here at Fit Small Business. Before joining the team, he worked with firms like Cantor Fitzgerald and BGC Partners. He then earned his master’s with a focus in Financial Risk Modeling and spent much of his career working in the startup space as a consultant and as a founder. When not working with small businesses, Dennis also teaches Economics at Queens College.
Although Kabbage provides all of its borrowers with monthly payments, it also states a minimum credit score requirement, unlike Fundbox. If you cannot qualify for Kabbage because of bad credit, consider evaluating bad credit business loans instead. Although the higher borrowing limit and longer terms of Kabbage exceed what Fundbox offers, you can get more capital with a lender like OnDeck.
Starting any business has a price, so you need to determine how you're going to cover those costs. Do you have the means to fund your startup, or will you need to borrow money? If you're planning to leave your current job to focus on your business, do you have money put away to support yourself until you start making a profit? Find out how much you're going to need.
29. Videos – This could be an entire section on it’s own. Many people have made money by creating YouTube videos. Evan of EvanTube is a kid and he has made millions by creating reviews of products that other kids his age would use. It’s not easy to get views into the millions, but once you do, you’ll start seeing some cash come in. Many bloggers have completely turned to videos to get their point across by starting a video blog.
As someone who's been immersed in a number of online industries for quite some time, I know a thing or two about what it takes to succeed in this arena. However, just like you, I started at ground zero with little knowledge, but a great deal of passion. What I learned along the way were some invaluable lessons from failure that hurt at the time, but helped immensely in the grand scheme of things.
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